Graduate Studies

Graduate students studying modern artwork

The graduate program in Art and Archaeology is designed to prepare students for teaching and research at the university level, curatorial positions in museums, and other careers in the visual arts. The department’s intimate size, together with Princeton’s commitment to teaching, ensures scholarly flexibility and close working relationships with faculty. Interdisciplinary study thrives at Princeton, and students are encouraged to take courses in related fields of the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Architecture. A number of interdisciplinary programs sponsor lectures and conferences; they also offer opportunities for graduate students to present their research. The department is committed to representing a full range of approaches to the history of art, from object-based research to many varieties of theory and criticism. Graduate study today necessarily involves the acquisition of specialized skills, notably foreign languages, and in-depth training in specific fields. The following fields count among the department’s particular strengths:

  • East Asian Art and Archaeology
  • Classical Art and Archaeology
  • Byzantine and Medieval Art
  • Renaissance and Baroque Art
  • African Art
  • Modern and Contemporary Art, including American Art and the History of Photography
  • The History of Architecture in all periods

Our department has excellent facilities and resources, such as Marquand Library, the Princeton University Art Museum, the Index of Medieval Art, and the Visual Resources Collection. Princeton is also well located between two major cities, Philadelphia and New York City, with good transportation. Washington D.C. is less than three hours away by train.Prospective applicants interested in visiting our department during the fall term prior to the application deadline should contact Diane Schulte, the Graduate Secretary.