Maria Alessia Rossi

Art History Specialist
Email Address: 
marossi@princeton.edu
Office Location: 
2C-13 Green Hall
Degrees: 

Ph.D., The Courtauld Institute of Art, London (UK) 2017

Profile

Ph.D., The Courtauld Institute of Art, London (UK) 2017

Maria Alessia Rossi’s main research interests include medieval monumental art in the Byzantine and Slavic cultural spheres, cross-cultural contacts between the Eastern and Western Christian world, and the role of miracles in text and image.

Rossi joined the Index of Medieval Art initially as a Postdoctoral Researcher, and starting in September 2019, as an Art History Specialist. She earned her BA in History of Art from 'La Sapienza' University of Rome and her MA and PhD from The Courtauld Institute of Art.

Over the last years, Rossi has taught at The Courtauld, worked for adult education institutions in London, and participated in the Princeton Prison Teaching Initiative. Since 2014, she has been co-organizing the research project Exploring Fourteenth-Century Art Across the Eastern and Western Christian World in collaboration with Livia Lupi. Rossi is the co-founder, together with Alice I. Sullivan, of the initiative North of Byzantium, sponsored by the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture, and of the digital platform Mapping Eastern Europe, and the co-editor of the Trivent book series Eastern European Visual Culture and Byzantium (13th–17th c.). Currently she is working towards the publication of a monograph exploring the role of Christ’s miracles in monumental art in late Byzantium.

Publications List: 
Selected Publications

Ed., with Alice I. Sullivan, Byzantium in Eastern European Visual Culture in the Late Middle Ages (Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2020).

“Byzantine Heritage and Serbian Ruling Ideology in Early Fourteenth-Century Monumental Painting” in Byzantium in Eastern European Visual Culture in the Late Middle Ages, eds. Maria Alessia Rossi, Alice I. Sullivan (Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2020) 119–42.

Ed., with Andrea Mattiello, Late Byzantium Reconsidered: The Arts of the Palaiologan Era in the Mediterranean (Abingdon, Oxon; New York, NY: Routledge, 2019).

“Reconsidering the Early Palaiologan Period: Anti-Latin Propaganda, Miracle Accounts, and Monumental Art” in Late Byzantium Reconsidered: The Arts of the Palaiologan Era in the Mediterranean, eds. Andrea Mattiello, Maria Alessia Rossi (Abingdon, Oxon; New York, NY: Routledge, 2019) 71-84.

“The Miracle Cycle between Constantinople, Thessaloniki, and Mistra” in From Constantinople to the Frontier: the City and the Cities, eds. Nicholas Matheou, Theofili Kampianaki, Lorenzo Bondioli (Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2016) 226-242.

Selected Papers

Byzantine Monuments in the Serbian Kingdom or Serbian Monuments in a Post-Byzantine World? 12th Congress of South-East European Studies, Bucharest, September 2-7, 2019

Simonis’ Contested Identity: Byzantine Princess and Serbian Queen, Christie's Education Conference, Celebrating Female Agency in the Arts, New York, June 26 - 27, 2018

Christ’s Miracle Cycle in Fourteenth-Century Multicultural Thessaloniki, 23rd International Congress of Byzantine Studies, Belgrade 22-27 August 2016

Andronikos II Palaiologos and the Orthodox Church: A Time of Flourishing or the Beginning of the End?, The International Medieval Congress, Leeds 6-9 July 2015