Robert Janson-La Palme *76 Visiting Professor Lectures & Conferences

The Robert Janson-La Palme *76 Visiting Professorship and Conference was endowed in 2002 in honor of Robert Janson-La Palme by his mother-in-law, Mrs. Lillian Marks.

Robert Janson-La Palme, professor emeritus of art history at Washington College in Maryland, received his B.A. from Brown University in 1952 and his Ph.D. from Princeton in 1976, studying under Professors Millard Meiss and John Rupert Martin.

This endowment was established to bring a visiting scholar and teacher of national and international stature to Princeton to teach and conduct other scholarly activities, primarily at the graduate level, in European art of the period 1200–1800 A.D.

Past

March 25, 2015
Caroline Walker BynumInstitute for Advanced Study, EmeritaRobert Janson-La Palme Lecture

Raised to Glory, Crowned with Gold: German Nuns and Their Statues in the Late Middle Ages

McCormick 101, 5:00 pm

Bynum
April 15, 2013
Martin J. KempTrinity College, OxfordRobert Janson-La Palme Lecture

It Doesn't Look Like Leonardo: Science, Connoisseurship, and Circumstance in the Attribution of Works of Art

Kemp-Flyer
November 16, 2011
David RosandColumbia University, emeritusRobert Janson-La Palme Lecture

Figuring the Renaissance: Leonardo, Dürer, Michelangelo, and Their Critics

Leonardo da Vinci, Vitruvian Man
December 12, 2009
Organized by Deborah HowardUniversity of CambridgeRobert Janson-La Palme Colloquium

Exploding the Can(n)on

Howard A
March 31, 2007
Organized by John Beldon ScottUniversity of IowaRobert Janson-La Palme Colloquium

Architecture and Ritual in Early Modern Europe: Interdisciplinary Strategies of Interpretation

Scott 2 cropped
March 7, 2006
Organized by Walter LiedtkeMetropolitan Museum of ArtRobert Janson-La Palme Colloquium

Art History in the University Versus Art History in the Museum

Liedtke cropped
September 19, 2003
Organized by Patricia Fortini Brown and John PintoPrinceton UniversityRobert Janson-La Palme Colloquium

The Italian Renaissance City: Art, Architecture, and City Identity

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Italian Renaissance City