Academic Year 2021–2022

New Archaeological Discoveries on Samothrace
May 20, 2022, 11:00 am

Cosponsor(s): Department of Art & Archaeology and Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies

Abstract

The sanctuary of the Great Gods on the Greek island of Samothrace was home to one of the ancient world’s most renowned mystery cults. The kings and queens who vied to succeed Alexander the Great funded lavish building projects at the…

Location
219 Aaron Burr Hall and Zoom

Speakers

Hansards in the World: Continuity and Discontinuity on the Intellectual, Cultural, and Economic Frontiers of the Early Modern Hanse
May 13, 2022, 9:00 am

Organized by Suzie Hermán, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Art & Archaeology, Princeton University, and Alexander Collin, Ph.D. Candidate, Amsterdam School of Historical Studies, University of Amsterdam

Thursday 12 May & Friday 13 May, 9 AM - 5 PM CET and 3 AM - 11 AM EST

Hansards in the World gathers and promotes new…

A Glass Dream. Byzantine Wall Mosaics and the Alchemy of Making
May 12, 2022, 5:00 pm

Sponsor(s): Department of Art and Archaeology

Abstract

‘Quality’ is one of those words that implicitly underpins a canon or canons of art history. Mosaics – of any period - are rarely included in the canons of art history, and mosaic as a medium is perceived as lurking somewhere between ‘art’ and ‘craft’. These two sentences are…

Location
A71 Louis A Simpson and Zoom
Hansards in the World: Continuity and Discontinuity on the Intellectual, Cultural, and Economic Frontiers of the Early Modern Hanse
May 12, 2022, 9:00 am

Organized by Suzie Hermán, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Art & Archaeology, Princeton University, and Alexander Collin, Ph.D. Candidate, Amsterdam School of Historical Studies, University of Amsterdam

Thursday 12 May & Friday 13 May, 9 AM - 5 PM CET and 3 AM - 11 AM EST

Hansards in the World gathers and promotes new…

Alvin Langdon Coburn, the Great War, and the "World's First Abstract Photographs"
May 5, 2022, 5:00 pm

Cosponsor(s): Princeton University Art Museum and Department of Art & Archaeology

Abstract

In February 1917, the American photographer Alvin Langdon Coburn staged a modest show of eighteen photographs and thirteen watercolors at the London Camera Club. By looking at the context of this exhibition of what his friend Ezra Pound…

Location
Friend Center 101 and Zoom - Open to all ∙ Registration required

Speakers

Art Hx 2022 Symposium: curative / spaces
Apr 28, 2022

Cosponsor(s): Princeton University’s Humanities Council Exploratory Grant in Collaborative Humanities, Center for Digital Humanities, Department of Art & Archaeology, Lewis Center for the Arts, and School of Architecture; 2021-24 Public Humanistic Inquiry Lab, Colby College; Confabulations: Durham University Institute for Medical Humanities…

Location
Virtual

Speakers

Inaugural Lecture: Lacunae of Art History and Kyiv’s Visual Culture
Apr 22, 2022, 12:00 pm

Cosponsor(s):This series of events is co-organized by Dumbarton Oaks in collaboration with North of Byzantium and Connected Central European Worlds, 1500–1700. Sponsors and Endorsers: Dumbarton Oaks | Princeton University (Art & Archaeology) | Boise State University | Tufts University College Art Association (CAA) | Byzantine Studies…

Location
Virtual

Speakers

Connecting Dunhuang Sites, Art, and Ideas along the Silk Road(s)
Apr 22, 2022

Cosponsor(s): Organized by the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art and cosponsored by the Princeton University Art Museum, the Department of Art and Archaeology, the East Asian Studies Program, and the Buddhist Studies Workshop.

Symposium overview

Strategically located on the edge of the Taklamakan desert in…

Location
50 McCosh and Zoom - Open to all ∙ registration required

Speakers

Voice and Vision at Sinai: Rethinking the Pilgrimage Model in Late Antiquity
Apr 21, 2022, 4:30 pm

Sponsor(s): Department of Art and Archaeology

Abstract

This lecture investigates the images and inscriptions at the Monastery of St. Catherine at Sinai, Egypt, to demonstrate that vision and voice are decisively dispersed at each of the Monastery’s major thresholds and in the framework of the theophanies it offers. In doing so,…

Location
East Pyne 010 PU ID holders only

Speakers

Veracity and Artifice in Baroque Spain: Rubens, Velázquez, and the place of armor in the visual celebration of Philip IV of Spain's kingship
Apr 20, 2022, 5:00 pm
Abstract

Philip IV of Spain (1605–1665) began his reign in 1621, at the age of sixteen, with the intent of restoring Spanish might and reputation internationally, in response to a period of perceived erosion and decline. The near-simultaneous end of a twelve-year truce with the Dutch Republic, which resulted in the resumption of warfare,…

Location
Hybrid | Aaron Burr 219 for PU ID holders only

Speakers

Sponsor
Department of Art and Archaeology
The Architecture of Confinement
Apr 14, 2022

Cosponsor(s): Department of African American Studies, Department of Art & Archaeology, Center for Collaborative History, Center for Health and Wellbeing, Humanities Council, Princeton Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities, Prison Teaching Initiative, Program for Community-Engaged Scholarship, School of Architecture…

Location
James Stewart Film Theater, 185 Nassau, please register

Speakers

Building the Islamic Metropolis: Cairo under the Mamluks
Apr 7, 2022, 4:30 pm

Cosponsor(s): Department of Art & Archaeology, Department of Near Eastern Studies, and The Program in Medieval Studies

Abstract

Cairo is a city with many superlative epithets. To the Egyptians, it is Misr (Egypt), Umm al-Dunya (Mother of the World), and the “City of Thousand Minarets,” for its unparalleled concentration of…

Location
Hybrid | Aaron Burr 219 PU ID holders only

Speakers

Black Earth Film Series: The Call of Mist (Redux) and Handsworth Songs by John Akomfrah
Mar 29, 2022, 6:00 pm

Cosponsor(s): Program in Visual Arts and Department of Art and Archaeology. The Black Earth series is supported through the John Sacret Young ’69 Lecture Series fund.

Event overview

Filmmaker John Akomfrah screens two of his films. The Call of Mist (Redux), set on a remote Scottish island, is an elegy to his late mother and a vivid…

Location
James Stewart Film Theater, 185 Nassau

Speakers

Black Earth Film Series: Kahlil Joseph, Onye Anyanwu and Bradford Young
Mar 22, 2022, 6:00 pm

Cosponsor(s): Program in Visual Arts and Department of Art and Archaeology. The Black Earth series is supported through the John Sacret Young ’69 Lecture Series fund.

Event Overview

Conceived by Kahlil Joseph and fugitive broadcasting since 2019, BLKNWS presents an uninterrupted stream of highly-curated found footage, originally…

Location
James Stewart Film Theater, 185 Nassau

Speakers

Charismatic Rulers and Spatial Void in a Material World: Art from the Akkadian Empire, c. 2350-2150 BCE
Mar 21, 2022, 4:30 pm

Cosponsor(s): Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and the Program in Archaeology | Ettinghausen Lecture

Abstract

Akkadian art is heralded as an innovative breakthrough in large part due to its ostensibly naturalistic renderings, such as the sculptural plasticity of figural forms and the appearance of landscape-like elements…

Location
Green Hall 3-S-15 - limited seating pre-registration required

Speakers

Dressing Las Meninas
Mar 17, 2022, 4:30 pm
Abstract

The inventive work of the artisans who dressed the court of Philip IV has always been visible in Diego Velázquez’s court portraits, yet the tailors, embroiderers, farthingale-makers, shoemakers, and their colleagues have long been forgotten, largely ignored by historians and art historians. None of the garments that they made have…

Location
Friend Center 113 Convocation Room ∙ PU ID holders only

Speakers

Zirwat Chowdhury & Kailani Polzak - Art and Empires: New World Views
Mar 15, 2022, 6:00 pm

Cosponsor(s): The Graduate School and Center for Collaborative History

Join us for the second event in the series “Art and Empires: New World Views.” Speakers Zirwat Chowdhury and Kailani Polzak will present their recent work on empire and enlightenment in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Both scholars work between…

Speaker

Art Hx: A Conversation with curator Natalie Willis
Mar 14, 2022, 4:30 pm

Cosponsor(s): The Humanities Council Exploratory Grant in Collaborative Humanities, the Center for Digital Humanities, and the Department of Art & Archaeology

Event Description

British-Bahamian curator and cultural worker Natalie Willis will discuss her curatorial practice, how it is shaped by a motivation to care for people…

Location
Virtual

Speakers

Brook Andrew and Stephen Gilchrist—Art and Empires: New World Views
Feb 8, 2022, 5:00 pm

Cosponsor(s): The Graduate School and the Center for Collaborative History

Empires put pressure on our capacities to perceive them, and empire is a theoretical object that demands perspectival multiplicity. This is the first event in a series that brings into conversation artists and scholars whose work articulates, complicates and…

POSTPONED TILL FALL '22 Between Rich and Poor in the Roman City: A new look at the socio- economic texture of a Pompeian sub-elite neighborhood
Feb 7, 2022, 4:30 pm

Postponed till Fall '22. Please check website for updates.

Cosponsor(s): Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and the Program in Archaeology | Clayburgh Lecture

Abstract

Roman cities present a patchwork of socio-economic contrast, with enormous civic monuments mixed among more modest spaces from shops to sewers, not…

Location
Postponed till Fall '22

Speakers

Imagining the Oriental South: The Enslaved Mixed-Race Beauty in British Art and Visual Culture, c. 1865-1880
Jan 27, 2022, 4:30 pm
Abstract

Using works like John Bell’s Octoroon (1868) and Robert Gavin’s Quadroon Girl (ca. 1872) as case studies, this talk explores Britons’ pronounced and continued fascination with the figure of the enslaved American mixed-race beauty—even and especially after the abolition of slavery in the United States rendered the potential of such…

Speakers

Power, Patronage, and Production: Book Arts from Central Europe (ca. 800–1500) in American Collections
Jan 14, 2022

Cosponsor(s): The Index of Medieval Art, Department of Art & Archaeology, the Center for Culture, Society and Religion, the Program in Medieval Studies, the German Department, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS), Humanities Council, Delaware Valley Medieval Association and The Morgan Library and Museum

Location
Virtual
Art History vs History? Reassessing the “Greek Revolution” in Art: Sources, Monuments, Contexts, Chronology.
Nov 18, 2021, 4:30 pm
Abstract

Generally speaking, in art period names have been of three kinds: political-dynastic (i.e., Periklean, Augustan or Carolingian), cultural (i.e., Medieval or Renaissance) and aesthetic (Classic, Mannerist, Baroque, for instance). The chronology of art history has tended to associate stylistic and formal terminology with historical…

Speakers

Fragments, Art, and Meaning in the Middle Ages
Nov 6, 2021

Sponsored by The Index of Medieval Art

Conference Topic

Seven speakers will consider the role played by fragments and fragmentation in the medieval and modern understanding of works of art. Their half-hour papers will address such topics as the use or reuse of fragments in the creation of new works; quotation and replication as a…

Speakers

Artful (Re)working: Pictures of Labor in Eighteenth-Century Japan
Oct 28, 2021, 4:30 pm

Cosponsor(s): Department of Art & Archaeology and Tang Center for East Asian Art

Abstract

From tilling and planting to food preparation, shop-tending, and drawing water, representations of physical labor have a long history of depiction within East Asian art. The reasons behind their appearance are familiar: they underscore…

Speakers

Anna Arabindan-Kesson & Chika Okeke-Agulu 'Black Bodies, White Gold – Art, Cotton, and Commerce in the Atlantic World'
Oct 27, 2021, 6:00 pm

Cosponsor(s): Labyrinth Books, Department of African American Studies, Department of Art and Archaeology, the Humanities Council and the Princeton Public Library.

Book Conversation

In Black Bodies, White Gold, Anna Arabindan-Kesson uses cotton, a commodity central to the slave trade and colonialism, as a focus for new…

Speakers

Leonard Barkan and Carolina Mangone 'The Hungry Eye: Eating, Drinking, and European Culture from Rome to the Renaissance'
Oct 26, 2021, 6:00 pm

Cosponsor(s): Labyrinth Books, Humanities Council, and Department of Art & Archaeology

Book Conversation

Eating and drinking can be aesthetic as well as sensory experiences. The Hungry Eye takes readers from antiquity to the Renaissance to explore the central role of food and drink in literature, art, philosophy, religion, and…

Speakers

Art Hx | A Conversation with the Curators of Designing Motherhood
Oct 25, 2021, 4:30 pm

Cosponsor(s): This event is sponsored by The Humanities Council Exploratory Grant in Collaborative Humanities, the Center for Digital Humanities, and the Department of Art & Archaeology

Abstract

What do the pregnancy test, the pessary, the at-home abortion kit, the state of family leave, midwifery care, and postpartum practices…

Speakers

Graduate Conference | Idyll and Utopia
Oct 8, 2021

Cosponsor(s): German Department, Program in European Cultural Studies, Department of Classics, Department of Art and Archaeology, Department of Comparative Literature, and the Program in Media and Modernity

Conference Summary

Idyll and utopia both refer to depictions of the satisfaction of needs in a temporal and spatial…

300 Years in a Convent, 50 in Hollywood | In Celebration of Filipino American History Month
Oct 6, 2021, 4:30 pm

Cosponsor(s): Program in American Studies; Program in Asian American Studies; Department of Art and Archaeology; and Lewis Center for the Arts

Program

Following a walk-through of the exhibition, Nadal will facilitate discussion between curator and professor Patrick Flores of the University of the Philippines and the NExSE …

Location
Colab in the Lewis Arts Complex (Forum Level)

Speakers

Decolonial Abstraction: Frank Bowling’s Atlantic Errantry
Sep 30, 2021, 4:30 pm
Abstract

The color field abstraction Frank Bowling produced during his time in New York from 1966 to 1975 was made possible by transatlantic journeys that cast the narrative of late modernism in an altered light. By looking closely at Bowling’s improvisational approach to the materiality of paint, this lecture examines cross-cultural…

Speakers

Let Them Rest in Peace: The Sacred Burials of Frescoes, Pots, and Rooms in the House of the Frescoes at Knossos
Sep 27, 2021, 4:30 pm

Cosponsor(s):Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and the Program in Archaeology | Thompson Lecture

Abstract

In 1923, in the heart of the Minoan settlement of Knossos, in the outskirts of the immense Palace, Arthur Evans and Duncan Mackenzie unearthed the remains of a small but imposing building. The rich deposit of…

Speakers

Art Hx | Medical Bondage, Mobility, & Fugitive Logic: Revisiting Harriet Tubman as an Intellectual Figure
Sep 27, 2021, 4:30 pm

Cosponsor(s): The Humanities Council Exploratory Grant in Collaborative Humanities, the Center for Digital Humanities, and the Departments of African American Studies and Art & Archaeology

Abstract

Building off the new emphasis on black women’s intellectual history, Deirdre Cooper Owens probes Harriet Tubman's intellectual…

Speakers

The Art Critic in the Global South
Sep 23, 2021, 4:30 pm
Abstract

Against the narrative of a global crisis of art criticism that has emerged almost exclusively from debates in Europe and America, this lecture considers alternative procedures of thought and modes of art writing that have their historical emergence in the global south. It will focus, in particular, on the figure of the art critic in…

Speakers

Amassing Perspectives: Recent Trends in Syriac Iconography
Sep 17, 2021

Cosponsors: The Committee for the Study of Late Antiquity and the Center for Collaborative History

Monastery wall paintings in Syria and Egypt, the illuminations of the Rabbula Gospels, and the architecture and decorations of churches in regions as diverse as Turkey and India are just some of the rich visual culture extant from the…

Art Hx | “He was running it like a plantation”: Psychiatric spaces and social death in the Jim Crow South
Sep 13, 2021, 4:30 pm

Cosponsor(s): This event is sponsored by The Humanities Council Exploratory Grant in Collaborative Humanities, the Center for Digital Humanities, and the Departments of African American Studies, Art & Archaeology, and Religion

Abstract

In 1967 a government inspector reported that conditions for Black patients in psychiatric…

Speakers