Course Highlights

The Vikings—as they Lived, Died, and Feasted

Vikings have an entrenched reputation—and it’s one that no longer convinces students of Dr. Janet Kay’s ART 478/HIS 476/HUM 476/MED 476 “The Vikings: History and Archaeology.” Through a robust semester that included guest lectures, a vibrant class debate, and an enthralling final project, Kay inspired students to reevaluate their…

Understanding Ancient Pottery by Reading, Seeing, and Recreating

Professor Nathan Arrington’s ART 412/CLA 412/HLS 407 “Ancient Greek Pottery” immersed students in the lives of the ancient Greeks through vessels.

Photography and the Making of the Modern World

ART 248: “Photography and the Making of the Modern World” explores key moments in the history of photography from its inventions in the early nineteenth century to its omnipresence in the twenty-first, with attention to underrepresented groups and unknown makers. Professor Monica Bravo investigated photography with students as a product of…

Examining the Feminist Critique with Artist and Trans Woman Zackary Drucker

Taught by AnnMarie Perl, ART 490/GSS 490/VIS 490 “The Feminist Critique, Fifty Years Later” examines feminist critiques of art history and contemporary art drawing on artworks by Rosa Bonheur, Georgia O’Keeffe, Adrian Piper, Cindy Sherman, Andy Warhol and others from the Princeton University Art Museum, as well as readings in art history, art criticism, cultural criticism, literature, and philosophy.

Course Highlight: ART 341/ARC 341 “Neo Architectures: Architecture and its past, from the Renaissance to Postmodernism”

Princeton’s campus is an ideal teaching ground for the study of architectural history, or, as Professor Basile Baudez puts it, “interrogating the complex relationships between present needs and past dreams.”

Course Highlight: ART 401: “Introduction to Archaeology”

Professor Holzman’s Spring 2023 ART 401: “Introduction to Archaeology” was a portal to a fascinating realm; through guest speakers, interaction with objects, and demonstrations, Holzman’s experience-driven approach brought the field of archaeology to life – on one occasion transporting students to the ancient past.

Each week students…

Course Highlight: ART 447: Siegecraft: Architecture, Warfare, and Media

Professor Carolyn Yerkes’ ART 447: “Siegecraft: Architecture, Warfare, and Media” examined warfare as the subject matter for art and architecture in the early modern world. Yerkes asserts that “Siegecraft was an art more complex than painting, more powerful than sculpture, and more monumental than any building in the early modern world.” …

Course Highlight: ART 388: “Fascist Aesthetics: Women & Photography Between the World Wars”

A&A Lecturer Jessica Williams Stark’s course ART 388: “Fascist Aesthetics: Women & Photography Between the World Wars” examined the rise of fascism through the lens of the female photographer in the interwar period. Alongside key theoretical texts on race, gender, colonialism, and exile, the course explored a diverse range of work by…

Course Highlight: FRS 183 "A Portrait of the Artist As..."

Professor Doherty’s FRS183 “Portrait of the Artist As...” first-year undergraduate seminar explores works of literary fiction that depart from the model of the Bildungsroman — and specifically the “artist’s novel” as developed in Goethe’s Wilhelm Meister (1795) and epitomized by Joyce’s Portrait of…

Course Highlight: ART 488 “The Modern Museum: Between Preservation & Action”

This semester, Princeton University Art Museum Director James Steward is teaching ART 488: “The Modern Museum: Between Preservation & Action.” The course raises an array of questions centered on the role of today’s museum.  How must it respond to the digital age and to a world of increasingly porous borders? Can it run the risk of…

Course Highlight: ART 431 “Living with Others: Art, Culture, and Identity in Medieval Spain”

ART 431, “Living with Others: Art, Culture, and Identity in Medieval Spain,” taught by Pamela Patton, who also directs the Index of Medieval Art, traveled to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to discuss works made by the medieval Christian, Muslim, and Jewish communities of the Iberian Peninsula with Dr. Julia Perratore, Assistant Curator of…

Course Highlight: ART 565 “Seminar in Modernist Art and Theory: Before and After Gender"

Co-taught by A&A Professors Bridget Alsdorf and Irene Small, ART 565: “Seminar in Modernist Art and Theory: Before and After Gender” revisits major approaches to feminist art history from the nineteenth century to the present, while considering how queer, trans, masculinity, and decolonial studies have transformed art-historical analysis…

Course Highlight: ART 209 “Between Renaissance and Revolution: Baroque Art in Europe”

Professor Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann’s ART 209, “Between Renaissance and Revolution: Baroque Art in Europe,” surveys changes in European art from the end of the Renaissance until the Age of Revolution c. 1800. A highlight of the course is visiting Princeton University Art Museum’s collection to examine works firsthand. “Certainly, my favorite…

Course Highlight: ART 343 “Topics in 19th-Century Art: Artists and Their Subjects”

ART 343 “Topics in 19th-Century Art: Artists and Their Subjects” explores the various representations of the relationship between artist and subject in the period between the French Revolution and the turn of the nineteenth century.

Course Highlight: ART 228 “Art and Power in the Middle Ages”

ART 228 “Art and Power in the Middle Ages” looks at politics and religion reflected in the art of Europe, the Middle East, and Africa between 300 and 1200 C.E., exploring the art of great courts as well as migratory societies and of religions including Catholicism, Orthodoxy, Judaism, and Islam.  Fundamental to the understanding…

Deciphering the Line between Science and Fiction in Art

Featured on Princeton’s homepage, Professor Rachael DeLue’s course “Science and its Fictions in the Long 19th Century” trains students across disciplines to see images with a critical eye.  Students hone their visual literacy by looking at early images purporting to represent science, including John James Audubon's “The Birds of…

Learning from Collections: Behind the Scenes at the Met

Students from ART 369/EAS 386: “The Arts and Archaeology of the Chinese Court” and ART 493/EAS 493: “Narrative and Visuality in China,” co-taught by the Department of Art & Archaeology’s Cheng-hua Wang with Chao-Hui Jenny Liu and Paize Keulemans from the Department of East Asian Studies, respectively, had the incredible opportunity to…

Course Highlight: ART 430: “Medieval Art: The Icon”
ART 430: “Medieval Art: The Icon”

Professor Charlie Barber’s ART 430 seminar on the icon examines devotional panel paintings from literally every angle.  The course explores the function, theory, and meaning of the icon and traces its history and impact through to modernism.

On a recent visit to…

Course Highlight: ART 485
ART 485: “Making Exhibitions: 17th-Century Flemish Paintings at Princeton"

What goes into developing an exhibition proposal for an Art Museum?  Students in Ronni Baer’s course ART 485: “Making Exhibitions: 17th-Century Flemish Paintings at Princeton,” will spend the fall semester learning every facet, with the Art Museum’s 17th-century…

Course Highlight: ART 562
Art 562: “Science and Its Fictions in the Long Nineteenth Century” 

Intrigue, falsehood, and revelation hover where science and the humanities intersect - and art often bears witness.  Professor Rachael DeLue’s graduate seminar Art 562: “Science and Its Fictions in the Long Nineteenth Century” explores this intersection in the…

Course Highlight: ART 106

Princeton home page highlights Art& Archaeology's "Looking Lab: Experiments in Visual Thinking and Thinking About Visuals" led by department lecturer, and recent Ph.D., Lucy Partman.

Course Highlight: CLA 247

From the Medieval Studies article titled Smeltin' In the Rain: A daylong demonstration of medieval-style smelting, the workshop showcased an iron-producing technique that began in the Iron Age, persisted through the Classical World and the Middle Ages to Colonial America. It is also a tradition that has been intentionally preserved by smiths in…

FRS165 Archaeology as History

The transition to online teaching this fall went very well for the hands-on experiential freshman seminar FRS165 Archaeology as History.

I first taught this course in the fall of 2018, with support from the Humanities Council and the Council on Science and Technology. The course gives incoming Princeton undergraduates a look at how…